Blast and Impact Dynamics

Department of Civil & Structural Engineering

Prof. Andy Tyas

Head of group, Professor in Blast and Impact Engineering

Contact

a.tyas@sheffield.ac.uk
+44 (0) 114 222 5735

Department of Civil and Structural Engineering
Sir Frederick Mappin Building
Mappin Street,
Sheffield,
S1 3JD

Profile

Andrew Tyas is a graduate of Loughborough University of Technology, who spent five years working in civil engineering design practice before returning to academia. He received his PhD in for University of Sheffield for a DERA sponsored study of impact dynamics and was appointed Lecturer in Structural Design in 1997.

His teaching interests include structural analysis, design and blast and impact dynamics. He is particularly interested in helping students develop the confidence and maturity to produce suitable design ideas at the initial concept stage. He has been closely involved with the growth of the innovative MEng degree in Structural Engineering and Architecture, accredited by both the IStructE and RIBA, and has developed close links with the School of Architecture at Sheffield, leading to a number of teaching publications. He is currently First and Second Year Undergraduate Tutor.

Dr Tyas is head of the blast and impact research group in the Department of Civil and Structural Engineering, managing the testing laboratory at Harpur Hill, Buxton where research into blast physics and the response of structures to rapid dynamic loading is conducted. He is also a Director of Blastech Ltd, a University spin-out company offering consultancy and commercial testing services to industry in the field of blast and impact loading of structures. Additionally, he collaborates with Matthew Gilbert in the development of computational optimisation-based methods for the design of structures.

Qualifications

PhD (University of Sheffield)

Research project(s)

Strain-rate effects in quartz sand

Sand
Soil-filled wire and geotextile gabions are commonly used to construct perimeter walls and other defensive infrastructure in military bases. They serve to protect personnel and key assets from the effects of blast and fragmentation. The attenuating properties of soil make it a highly effective defence against such threats, and as...

Publication(s)

(2017). Predicting the role of geotechnical parameters on the output from shallow buried explosives. International Journal of Impact Engineering, 102 (21-22), pp. 117-128. (Full Text).
(2016). Energy absorption in lattice structures in dynamics: Nonlinear FE simulations. International Journal of Impact Engineering, 102 (3), pp. 1-15. (Full Text).
(2016). Investigating high strain rate shear in soils using a split Hopkinson pressure bar. In 3rd UK Defence Seminar on the High Strain Rate Properties of Soils and Granular Media.
(2016). Preface to special edition on blast load characterisation. International Journal of Protective Structures, 7 (3), pp. 303-304. (Full Text).
(2016). Measuring spatial pressure distribution from explosives buried in dry Leighton Buzzard sand. International Journal of Impact Engineering, 96 (2), pp. 89-104. (Full Text).

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